Spirit Message of the Moment for Kids! – Happy New Year 2014

BE HONEST WITH YOURSELF
“This card indicates that you’re hiding your true feelings and aren’t being forthright about an important topic. The fairies urge you to admit your true feelings to yourself.

298080_281878188495957_4326101_nDo you feel stuck? Sad or angry? These are all symptoms that arise when we’re dishonest with ourselves. Maybe you feel that you can’t afford to be honest with yourself and that you don’t have a choice. This card isn’t asking you to make any radical life changes or have a confrontation with another person. However, it is urging you to admit your true feelings to yourself.

One easy way to get in touch with your true feelings is by going outside and engaging in a silent conversation with the fairies who live amidst the flowers, trees, and grass. Even if you can’t yet see 479912_300187596763464_968579783_nor hear the fairies, mentally tell them everything you’re thinking, feeling, and experiencing these days. Ask them to help you get in touch with your deepest feelings. The fairies love to hold a mirror up to us so that we can see and admit the truth.

Affirmation: It’s safe for me to be honest with myself and others. I speak my truth with love.”

Today’s guidance is from Healing with the Fairies Oracle Cards by Doreen Virtue, Ph.D.

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HAPPY NEW YEAR 2014 Spirit Friends

Thank you so much for all your support, light, and great comments on both my blog and Facebook page this past year! I’ve so enjoyed the last four and a half years writing this blog and sharing readings with you of some of my favorite oracle systems with you; I am so pleased it resonat405368_10150500037554734_1317162623_nes with where you find yourself – at that exact moment in time. Here’s to a beautiful new year for you – full of intuition, infinite possibilities, adventures, laughter, abundance, and joy. Unlimited happiness is waiting for us today, we just have to open the door to let it into our lives.

My advice for the new calendar year? Take time to dream – and Dream BIG. Then Dream even Bigger than that! Go ahead and surprise yourself and take the chance; you’re worth it. Life always gives us the opportunity to change, expand, and grow into who we want to be; whether reinventing ourselves and rebuilding our lives, or simply being brave enough to let our light shine with others and proudly shine it into the world at large. Here’s to letting your light shine – and Bright! May you find inspiration everywhere you travel, with whomever you meet. May you use your intuition and spiritual instincts to discover new passions (and remember old ones), find ways to help heal hearts (even if it’s only your own), and invent countless ways to add something of good spiritual value to the world. May you live your life with a full heart and your time for learning, change, and growth never end. Wishing you much love and light for a great new year for 2014.
Bright Blessings to You,
Angela 

Spirit Message of the Moment for KIDS! – Living with Magick

Do Your Kids Live As Magically As You Do?

As more people embrace earth-based spiritual paths, it’s becoming more common to find Wiccans and Pagans who are rearing children in their faith. Learn tips and tricks for raising Pa7182_500440550011936_119798958_ngan kids, and living as a Pagan family — how can you celebrate the Sabbats in a kid-friendly fashion, deal with teachers who may be insensitive to your beliefs, and raise well-adjusted kids in a non-mainstream religion?

How to Keep Your Kids Included in Pagan Practice
As the modern Pagan movement progresses and evolves, the Pagan community has grown to encompass people of all age levels. Those who discovered Paganism as teens or college students two or three decades ago are now raising their own children, and so the demographic within the Pagan community is constantly changing. It’s not uncommon at all to meet families in which one or both parents are Pagans or Wiccans, and they may have kids who follow a variety of religious paths.

65000_518363668183457_2992806_nOne of the questions that arises, though, is that ofhow to include children in Pagan practice. After all, it’s not as though there’s a Pagan version of Sunday school for us to send our kids off to. Don’t worry, though — there are a number of different ways you can include your kids in your Pagan beliefs, and get them involved. Although the type of activity you do with them may vary based upon age levels, you can always find some way to incorporate Pagan values and beliefs into your kids’ lives.

Finally, remember that the best way to set a good example of Pagan practice for your kids is to show them yourself. If you want to stress values such as being kind to others, respecting the earth, and living a magical life each day, then do so. Your kids will see your behavior and emulate it themselves.

Activity: Do a hands-on nature project. Take a hike in the woods, gather foun547286_489788197698506_240755671_nd objects like pinecones and fallen twigs. Bring them home and put them together in a glass vase or some other centerpiece.
Teaching moment: Talk about the cycles of the season, and how all of nature is tied together. Depending on the time of year, discuss the phases of life, death, and rebirth in the natural world.

ActivityMake a wand. Even a small child can decorate a stick with glitter.
Teaching moment: Use this opportunity to help your child learn about directing energy. Help him or her visualize energy as something they can control using the wand to direct it.

Activity: Create a felt board. Cut out shapes of Pagan symbols, gods and goddesses of your tradition, or magical tools out of scraps of craft felt, and help your child place them on the board.
Teaching moment: Encourage imagination — your child can use the felt board and pieces to illustrate a story of her own about the deities, magic, or the world in general.

girlActivity: Let your kids have an altar. Allow your child to create an altar space of his own, with the gods and goddesses of your family’s tradition. If you don’t follow a specific path, let him put things on their altar such as found items, natural goodies, and items of comfort.
Teaching moment: Letting your child have his own altar shows them that their needs are valued as much as anyone else’s in the family. It gives them a space that is private and sacred of their very own.

Activity: School-age children can often participate in rituals, if they have a decent attention span. You know your child better than anyone, and if you think she is capable of taking a ritual role, then encourage that.
Teaching moment: This helps your child develop a feel for ritual procedure, as well as proper behavior in a ritual setting. Equally important, it lets her know that her participation in family activities is valued.

Activity: Encourage your child to learn about the deities of your family’s tradition. There are countless books about the mythology and legends of the Greeks, the Celts, the Romans, the Egyptians, and others. Keep a good library of Pagan-friendly books on hand, and spend some time reading together as well.
Teaching moment: You’re never too young to do a little research. Giving kids the tools to read and grow can’t hurt at all, and it allows them to take some ownership of their spiritual education.

Activity: If your teen is up to the task, ask him to write a ritual of his own, with only as much help as he needs. Teenagers are surprisingly inventive, and can come up with some amazing i224535_300187570096800_1475111372_ndeas. Pick a Sabbat or other event, and have your teen create a ceremony that the whole family can participate in.
Teaching moment: Not only does this encourage creative thinking, it helps develop leadership skills. It’s never too soon to get a chance at being in charge.

Activity: Kids of any age can get involved with Sabbat-themed craft ideas. Try some of our different Sabbat crafts to celebrate the ever-changing Wheel of the Year, and use these to decorate your home and altar.
Teaching moment: By doing hands-on projects related to the various Sabbats, kids can get a better feel for what the Pagan celebrations really mean. Depending on your tradition, incorporate craft projects into stories, legends, and mythology.

Recommended Reading for Pagan Parents

  • Madden, Kristin: Pagan Parenting. Madden’s book focuses looks at the development of kids from birth onward. She includes tips on how to encourage your children’s psychic and magickal abilities, as well as teaching them rituals and meditation skills.
  • Serith, Ceisiwr: The Pagan Family. Serith looks at raising a family in non-mainstream religions, and offers dozens of excellent suggestions on how to incorporate Pagan beliefs into day-to-day living. This book is presently out of print, but it pops up a lot on used-book lists, so keep an eye out for it.
  • Starhawk: Circle Round – Raising Children in Goddess Traditions. Starhawk and fellow authors Anne Hill and Diane Baker include numerous ideas for each Sabbat, life milestones, and craft and recipe ideas. This book offers some excellent suggestions for families trying to instill Pagan beliefs into their children.

Be sure to read our extensive list of Pagan-friendly Books for Kids, and Activities for Pagan Kids!

- All Excerpts from Patti Wigington

Spirit Message of the Moment for Kids! Plant Seeds for Your Life

A FALL FAMILY EXERCISE FOR PARENTS AND KIDS

Create a Symbolic Seed Planting Tradition 
Invite friends to gather and celebrate the New Year on October 31 or November 1, which in ancient times for the Celts was celebrated as thplantsinpotse New Year. (This also coincides with the Wiccan holiday of Samhain, which signals the beginning of a new turn on the Wheel of the Year.) Hand out a piece of paper to each person at the gathering and ask everyone toPlanting_A_Tree_H write down their resolution. Then take turns reading them aloud to the group to share everyone’s hopes and dreams.

During this time, the group offers their encouragement and blessings. As each person finishes reading aloud their dreams, a candle is lit for them and a toast with juice or water is given.

Pay particular attention to what you drink and toast to around Halloween, for with each glass you raise in a toast, the energy will be pomsorbetjuiceheightened. Pick a seasonal berry you enjoy. This is a time when the energy fields and the Veil between the earthly plane and the spirit worlds are wide open. This creates a rare opportunity to manifest your desires by imbuing into the liquid what you are thinking and saying as you make each toast. You truly can activate your libations with your energy, turning them into powerful potions, which you then drink and absorb into your auric fields.

Next, hand out packages of seeds along with little clay pots filled with soil and invite your guests to plant new seeds of thought this fall to manifest in the spring. Have each person write one word that describes the goal they wish to manifest on the outside of their clay pot or plastic container. A permane535462_541567085872149_15674059_nnt marker works best for this purpose.

On January 1, celebrate the conventional New Year with a toast to your dreams. They have been actively manifesting for several months now in your mental auric field and will soon be ready for action in the outer world this coming spring. Depending on the seed you planted, you might consider transplanting it into the ground come Spring or Summer for your plant to flourish. 

Excerpts from The Awakened Aura by Kala Ambrose

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Spirit Message of the Moment for KIDS! – Make A Wish – or Two

 IT’S TIME TO MAKE A WISH
“This is a magical moment. Make a wish, and enjoy its manifestation.”

“Say an affirmation prayer right now, which means stating your desire as if it were already true. Thank the Universe for this reality, and feel in your heart and belly that your dream is actually a reality. For example, say, “Thank you World, for (whatever your desire is). I’m truly grateful for your continuous support.”istock_000020196xsmall

“Now is the magical moment. Go into a quiet space – even if it’s just for a moment. Close your eyes, and imagine that your wish  has come true. Feel it with your entire being. Then, express thanks for this gift, and release it like a helium balloon that goes straight to the Moon. If you need to take action to co-create this wish, you’ll be given strong and repetitive guidance in the form of feelings, thoughts, ideas, inner words, signs, visions, or dreams. It’s important that you follow this guidance in order to bring the wish into physical form.”

This excerpt is from: Magical Mermaids and Dolphins by Doreen Virtue, Ph.D.

MESSAGE FROM SPIRITBLOGGER
405368_10150500037554734_1317162623_nManifesting your desires is a beautiful thing because you are a powerful source. Life is full of surprises at every turn. Fill yourself with wonder. Fill yourself with confidence in the World. Fill yourself with belief in yourself and trust. Now is the perfect time to focus on what you want. Send your positive wish out to the Universe and let go of all expectations about fulfillment and how it might come to pass, and when. Be open to receiving in all different forms.  Release your worries and don’t over think it. Everything that is yours will come to you in its own perfect and unique time. Now is the time for changes. Just believe and so it is. The Universe is always eager to help those who are first willing to help themselves by stepping forward with action towards making their dreams a reality.

- Angela 

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Spirit Message of the Moment for Kids! – Fun Litha Crafts & Activities

CELEBRATE THE PAGAN HOLIDAY LITHA – THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 2013

Celebrate Litha With These Small Children Activities 
Litha is a Pagan Sabbat honoring the Goddess as the Mother, the God as the Father, and tlitha_enhancedheir children or the child in all of us. Here are some activities to help Pagan Parents include their small children in the celebration. Head out into the back yard and enjoy the day!

Earth Puppets
Materials: Use natural items found in the yard, tape, and glue.

The easiest kind of puppets can be made from a twig. Select a twig that forks. You now have 2 arms and a handle to hold the puppet with. Find a fallen flower, and tape the stem to the handle for the head. You can also tape the stem of a fallen leaf to the handle for the head. For clothpinecone funing, wrap a leaf around the handle, and your puppet has natural summer wear.

Another puppet can be made with a pine cone. Glue the pine cone to the forked twig, for the head. Dried and fresh grass make loads of hair styles, beards, and mustaches. Use seeds or small rocks for eyes, nose, and mouth. Make clothing out of leaves and bonnets out of flower petals or acorn caps. Use a large box or table for the stage, and enjoy the show.

Vegetable Tray Puppets 
Materials: Large carrots, popsicle sticks, cream cheese, raisins or olives, celery, parsley, green beans, radishes, cauliflower buds, broccoli buds, cucumber spears, any other desired vegetable, and cheese slices.

Having trouble getting the younger children to eat their vegetables? Let them play with their food! Peel several large carrots and cut off both ends. With a paring knife (adults only) cut a slit in the bottom of the larger end. Place several carrots on a plate. On a serving tray, in the middle place a small bowl of cream cheese, and surround with “garnishing vegetables”. Cut cheese slices lengthwise to strips of hair.  Insert popsicle stick in the slit in a carrot. Using the cream cheese as glue, attach raisins or olives as eyes, and other assorted vegetables as arms, legs, hair, etc. Let the child(ren) put on a mealtime play before eating the characters. Lots of fun for the whole family! 

Treasure Boxes 
Materials: Sturdy cardboard box, natural items for dSHOEBOXecoration, white glue, med-size paint brush.

This little box is for the youngster to collect “treasured” memories from summer. Start with a large shoe box and lid. Let the child collect some items from the yard, the park, and/or the beach. Glue flat items to the box, and place the non-flat items inside. To give the box a more durable finish, brush on a coat of white glue diluted with water. Encourage the child to tell stories of where the different items came from, or make up stories about the contents.

Wheelbarrow Planter 
Materials: 1 plastic detergent scoop, 2 large brightly colored buttons, white glue, 1 cup potting soil, seeds.

Take the plastic detergent scoop and poke a couple of small holes in the bottom (adults only!) with a nail or a needle. Let each child pick out two brightly colored buttons for the wheels. Glue wheels onto the sides of the scoop so that it sits at an angle. Once the glue has dried, let the child pour 1/2 cup of potting soil in the scoop, place in a couple of seeds around the sides of the scoop, and pour in the rest of the soil. Slowly add water to the soil until soaked through. Place on small dish in sunny spot. Watch the new life grow from the seeds and spring forth from the soil just as life springs forth from the Goddess.

Litha Spiral Candles 
Materials: Decorating wax strips or preprinted wax logs, plain ball or short pillar candle(s), craft or butter knife.

Have your child choose a couple of colored wax strip combinations. Cut each strip into 2 pieces 2 3/4″ long and on piece that is 2″ long. Lay a short length of one color over a longer length of another color and roll them into a tight spiral log, 1/2″ in diameter by 11/2″ long. When you’ve got eight logs use the knife (adults or older children) to cut each log into as many slices as you can. Firmly press the wax slices all around the outside of the candle, starting at the base and working up. Continue placing the slices as close together as possible until the whole candle is covered.

Stained Glass Sun Catchers
Materials:Wax paper, crayon shavingsSTAINEDGLASSFISH, colored string, yarn, or thread, lace, leaves, flower petals.

To begin, have the child empty crayon shavings from their sharpener, or (adults only!) use a paring knife to create shavings. A cheese grater works great for large crayons. Arrange shavings, and any of the accessory items the child chooses and sandwich between two sheets of wax paper. Iron (adults, of course) the whole package on low setting, just until the shavings melt. Cut the “stained glass” into shapes and hang them with stringcrayonleaves, in a sunny window.

Fairies’ Feathered Friend Feeder 
Materials: An empty milk carton, nontoxic paint, glitter, white glue, popsicle sticks, 10″ wooden dowel w/ 1/4″ diameter, wire hanger (cut bottom of hanger for inserting into milk carton), birdseed.

Rinse out milk carton thoroughly. Do not completely open top, rather glue open spout bBIRDFEEDER2ack together. Cut 3″ wide by 4″ long arched openings on “spout” side and opposite side of carton, with base of opening approx. 3″ from bottom of carton. Let the child paint the outside of the carton in Litha colors of red, yellow, orange, white, green. Before the paint dries let child sprinkle colored glitter all over the carton, (birds are attracted to shiny objects). Let carton dry. Glue painted or non-painted popsicle stick shingles onto the top of the carton as a roof. For the peBIRDFEEDER1rches, poke holes in the carton just below the openings, and slip the wooden dowel through the holes. Poke two holes in the top of the carton just under the roof, insert one end of the cut hanger into each hole. Fill the bottom of the carton with wild birdseed. Hang in a spot that is easy to view, but far enough away from fences or other objects to thwart predators. Tell child how fairies, brownies, and sprites ride on the backs of birds to get from one place to another if it is too far to walk.

Excerpts from: Akasha Ap, The Celtic Connection

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Spirit Message of the Day for Kids – Look Out!

LOOK OUT – A SURPRISE IS COMING YOUR WAY! 
The card I pulled for you today is called Surprise! This means keep your eyes open and look for a special surprise throughout your day! This surprise could hold personal meaning for you.  Perhaps you may hear a favorite song, or receive a visit from a friend, or get a phone call from a loved one. Presents come in all shapes and sizes – especially the spiritual gifts we all receive each and every day! All we have to do to see them is open our hearts and minds to become aware of what and who surrounds us. If we are grateful for what we have and who we have in our lives; more will always come.

- The Spiritblogger

253185_157848997613659_1071666_n

Mr. Moon

O Moon, Mr. Moon,
When you comin’ down?
Down on the hilltop,
Down in the glen,
Out in the clearin’,
To play with little men?
Moon, Mr. Moon,
When you comin’ down?

O Mr. Moon,
Hurry along!
The reeds in the current
Are whisperin’ slow;
The river’s a wimplin’
To and fro.
Hurry up along,
Or you’ll miss the song!
Moon, Mr. Moon,
When you comin’ down?

O Moon, Mr. Moon,
When you coming down?
Down where the Good Folk
Dance in a ring,
Down where the Little Folk
Sing?
Moon, Mr. Moon,
When you comin’ down?

By Bliss Carman

Spirit Message of the Moment for KIDS! Tips for Pagan Parents

Raising Pagan Children
As more people embrace earth-based spiritual paths, it’s becoming more common to find Pagans who are rearing children in their faith. Learn tips and tricks for raising Pagan kids, and living as a Pagan 68494_393338574078814_641511651_nfamily — how can you celebrate the Sabbats in a kid-friendly fashion, deal with teachers who may be insensitive to your beliefs, and raise well-adjusted kids in a non-mainstream religion?

How to Keep Your Kids Included in Pagan Practice
As the modern Pagan movement progresses and evolves, the Pagan community has grown to encompass people of all age levels. Those who discovered Paganism as teens or college students two or three decades ago are now raising their own children, and so the demographic within the Pagan community is constantly changing. It’s not uncommon at all to meet families in which one or both parents are Pagans or Wiccans, and they may have kids who follow a variety of religious paths.

One of the questions that arises, though, is that of how to include children in Pagan practice. After all, it’s not as though there’s a Pagan version of Sunday school for us to send our kids off to. Don’t worry, though — there are a number of different ways you can include your kids in your Pagan beliefs, and get them involved. Although the type of activity you do with them may vary based upon age levels, you can always find some way to incorporate Pagan values and beliefs into your kids’ lives.

Activity:
Do a hands-on nature project. Take a hike in the woods, gather found objects like pinecones and fallen twigs. Bring them home and put them together in a glass vase or some other centerpiece.
Teaching moment:
Talk about the cycles of the season, and how all of nature is tied together. Depending on the time of year, discuss the phases of life, death, and rebirth in the natural world.

Activity:
Make a wand. Even a small child can decorate a stick with glitter.
Teaching moment: Use this opportunity to help your child learn about directing energy. Help him or her visualize energy as something they can control using the wand to direct it.

Activity:
Create a felt board. Cut out shapes of Pagan symbols, gods and goddesses of your tradition, or magical tools out of scraps of craft felt, and help your child place them on the board.
Teaching moment:
Encourage imagination — your child can use the felt board and pieces to illustrate a story of her own about the deities, magic, or the world in general.

374988_504680596258235_1741713014_nActivity:
Let your kids have an altar. Allow your child to create an altar space of his own, with the gods and goddesses of your family’s tradition. If you don’t follow a specific path, let him put things on their altar such as found items, natural goodies, and items of comfort.
Teaching moment:
Letting your child have his own altar shows them that their needs are valued as much as anyone else’s in the family. It gives them a space that is private and sacred of their very own.

Activity:
School-age children can often participate in rituals, if they have a decent attention span. You know your child better than anyone, and if you think she is capable of taking a ritual role, then encourage that.
Teaching moment:
This helps your child develop a feel for ritual procedure, as well as proper behavior in a ritual setting. Equally important, it lets her know that her participation in family activities is valued.

Activity:
Encourage your child to learn about the deities of your family’s tradition. There are countless books about the mythology and legends of the Greeks, the Celts, the Romans, the Egyptians, and others. Keep a good library of Pagan-friendly books on hand, and spend some time reading together as well.
Teaching moment: You’re never too young to do a little research. Giving kids the tools to read and grow can’t hurt at all, and it allows them to take some ownership of their spiritual education.

Activity:
If your teen is up to the task, ask him to write a ritual of his own, with only as much help as he needs. Teenagers are surprisingly inventive, and can come up with some amazing ideas. Pick a Sabbat or other event, and have your teen create a ceremony that the whole family can participate in.
Teaching moment:
Not only does this encourage creative thinking, it helps develop leadershi429114_518114268218987_1052501254_np skills. It’s never too soon to get a chance at being in charge.

Activity:
Kids of any age can get involved with Sabbat-themed craft ideas. Try some of our different Sabbat crafts to celebrate the ever-changing Wheel of the Year, and use these to decorate your home and altar.
Teaching moment:
By doing hands-on projects related to the various Sabbats, kids can get a better feel for what the Pagan celebrations really mean. Depending on your tradition, incorporate craft projects into stories, legends, and mythology.
Finally, remember that the best way to set a good example of Pagan practice for your kids is to show them yourself. If you want to stress values such as being kind to others, respecting the earth, and living a magical life each day, then do so. Your kids will see your behavior and emulate it themselves.

Ten Activities for Pagan Kids
For many Pagans and Wiccans, it’s hard to find kid-friendly activities that celebrate our spiritual path. Believe it or not, sharing your beliefs with your kids is easier than you think. After all, you’re the parent, so you can lead by example. Show your children what you do, and they’ll emulate you in their own way. Teaching by doing is the key. By living a Pagan life, you’ll show your kids what it means to be Pagan or Wiccan or whatever your family’s path is. These very simple activities are easy enough that you can do them with nearly any child, so have fun with them!

1. Make a Wand
What’s not to love about making your own wand? Take your kids out in the woods for a nature walk, and ask them to keep an eye on the ground for the “right” stick. The wand should be about the same length as the child’s forearm. Once your child has a stick, bring it home and decorate it with flowers, ribbons, glitter, even crystals. Hold a consecration ceremony so your child can claim the wand as his or her own.

484096_450647788315882_526427266_n2. Drumming
Everyone likes to drum, and the louder the better. If you don’t have a professional drum, don’t worry — that’s why the gods made coffee cans. Let your kids experiment with containers of different sizes and shapes, and see which ones make the most interesting sounds. Fill an empty water bottle with dried beans to make an impromptu rattle. Two thick dowels tapped together make a percussion instrument as well. Have a family drum circle night, and let everyone bang away to raise energy.

3. Meditation
Sure, the idea of teaching a toddler to meditate sounds crazy, but you’d be surprised what kids can do if they’re interested. Even if it’s just two minutes lying in the grass looking at trees, it’s not a bad idea to start your youngsters meditating early. By the time they get to be adults with stressful lives, meditation will be second nature to them. Use breathing as a way of teaching counting to small children. Elementary-school age kids can usually handle a ten- to fifteen-minute guided meditation.

4. My Very Own Altar
If you have a family altar, that’s great! Encourage your kids to have an altar of their own in their bedrooms — this is the place they can put all the things that are special to them. While you may not want a tribe of Ninja Turtles on your family altar, if your son says they’re his Personal Guardians, give him his own place to put them! Add to the collection with interesting things your child finds on nature walks, shells from trips to the beach, family photos, etc. Be sure that young children don’t have candles or incense on their altar.

5. Moon Crafts
Kids love the moon, and they love to wave at it and say hello to it (my oldest claimed the moon as her own when she was five). If your family does any sort of moon rituals, such as an Esbat Rite or New Moon ceremony, have the kids decorate a mirror with lunar symbols, or make a Moon Braid to hang in a window, and use it on your altar during family moon celebrations. Bake a batch of Moon Cookies to use during Cakes & Ale ceremonies.

6. God’s Eyes
These are an easy decoration to make and can be adapted seasonally, simply b522290_552860944740192_1779391917_ny using different colors. All you need is a pair of sticks and some yarn or ribbon. Make a God’s Eye in yellows or reds for solar celebrations, green and brown for an earth ceremony, or in the colors of your family’s household deities. Hang them on a wall or place on an altar.

7. Salt Dough Ornaments
Salt dough is one of the easiest things in the world to make, and you can create just about anything from it. You can follow our easy Salt Dough recipe, and use it with cookie cutters to make your own Sabbat ornaments. After your ornaments have cooled, paint them and decorate with your favorite Pagan and Wiccan symbols.
After you’ve painted them, seal them with clear varnish. If you’re planning to hang them, poke a hole through the ornament BEFORE baking them. Then after you’ve varnished them, run a ribbon or thread through the hole.

8. Wheel of the Year Journal
Get your child a blank notebook, and have them keep track of the patterns of nature. Note the dates that the first buds appear in spring, when birds begin to migrate, and when the weather changes. If your child is old enough to surf the Internet, have him predict the weather for the next few days and then compare it to your local weather forecast — and then see who’s right! As the Wheel of the Year turns, your child can help you prepare for upcoming Sabbat celebrations.

9. Mythic Tales
Many parents aren’t really sure how to incorporate their Pagan beliefs into their children’s upbringing, so story time is a great way to do this. Teach your child the myths and legends of your pantheon. Storytelling is an age-old tradition, so why not use it to educate your kids about what you believe? Tell them tales of gods and heroes, fairies, and even your own ancestors.

541919_10151168294597477_1096741949_n10. Singing and Chanting
There are a ton of great songs out there for Pagan kids, and most of them are really simple. You can make up your own with some simple rhymes and a little bit of ingenuity. Clap your hands, stomp your feet, and celebrate the gifts of the earth. If you want to find pre-recorded music for your kids, read some of the Pagan and Wiccan magazines; there are nearly always ads for Pagan musicians and their work.

Recommended Reading for Pagan Parents
• Madden, Kristin: Pagan Parenting. Madden’s book focuses looks at the development of kids from birth onward. She includes tips on how to encourage your children’s psychic and magickal abilities, as well as teaching them rituals and meditation skills.
• Serith, Ceisiwr: The Pagan Family. Serith looks at raising a family in non-mainstream religions, and offers dozens of excellent suggestions on how to incorporate Pagan beliefs into day-to-day living. This book is presently out of print, but it pops up a lot on used-book lists, so keep an eye out for it.
• Starhawk: Circle Round – Raising Children in Goddess Traditions. Starhawk and fellow authors Anne Hill and Diane Baker include numerous ideas for each Sabbat, life milestones, and craft and recipe ideas. This book offers some excellent suggestions for families trying to instill Pagan beliefs into their children.

Excerpts from Patti Wigington

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Spirit Message of the Moment for KIDS! – Talk About Your Feelings

EXPRESS YOURSELF
“It’s time to talk about your feelings. Tell a friend how you feel. This card means that you’ve been holding some feelings inside and need to let them out.533602_511404685548414_901041319_n

When you talk or write about your feelings in a journal, you can understand them better. Sometimes you don’t know how you really feel until you begin talking. It’s not healthy to hold in your emotions, especially anger or sadness.

Find a trusted person who will listen to you, such as a friend, family member, or teacher. Let that person know that you need to talk, and tell them what you need. For instance, if you want them to listen without giveing you advice, then let them know. If you want them to comfort you, then let them know.

If you don’t have someone to talk to, or your feelings are so private that you don’t want to share them out loud, then you could write about them. You can also silently talk to your angels or the unicorns. They’ll listen to you with love, and help you feel better and find answers.”

Today’s guidance is from Magical Unicorns Oracle Cards by Doreen Virtue, Ph.D.

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Spirit Message of the Moment for KIDS! – Explore Your Ancestory

WHO WERE YOUR ANCESTORS?
“Ancestors are those from whom we are descended, with a lineage that starts with our parents and grandparents and stretches back hundreds and even thousands of years. We cargrandmothers_handsry our ancestor’s bloodline and are connected to them both genetically and spiritually in an underlying continuity of which we may only barely be aware. Although environment and circumstance contribute to shaping us – particularly when we’re young – an innate thread of kinship exists that has run the course of history for thousands of years and is contained in our bodies and in our being.”

“Since we’re biologically and soulfully connected to these spirit beings, we can readily call upon them for guidance and assistance in matters concerning our family, community, and ourselves. No matter our lineage, we have much to learn from our ancestors.”

MESSAGE FOR YOU
“You have within you the blood of your ancestors. You are deeply connected to your lineage, the most immediate proof of that being the physical resemblance you have to your mother and father and perhap392077_276696215763900_1827048272_ns even your grandparents. Yet beyond that, although unknown to your usual senses, you are connected to an ancestory that reaches back through the millennia. This is the time to call upon those ancestors, those who are of your bloodline as well as though ancient ones who have walked the land that you now walk.”

“In many cultures, it is believed that the essence of your ancestors inhabits many of the physical aspects of the land. In other words, they are in the trees, the water, the air, the animals, the stones – their blood being in the very dirt and sand you tread upon.”

“Next time you are outside, allow your senses to open to those ancestors who abide in the physical world. And anytime at all, allow your heart to open to those spirits to whom you are related through your heredity and those to whom you are connected by virtue of the land upon which you live.”

Today’s special message is from Earth Magic Oracle Cards by Steven D. Farmer.

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Spirit Message of the Moment for KIDS! – Ideas to Celebrate Imbolc 2013

TIME TO CELEBRATE IMBOLC
As Imbolc approaches, it’s a good time to get crafty and creative with your kids. By February, most of us are tired of the cold, snowy season. Imbolc reminds us that spring is coming soon, and that we only have a few more weeks of winter to go. The sun gets a little brighter, the earth gets302528_424689224246952_1825481881_n a little warmer, and we know that life is quickening within the soil.

Brighid Crafts
Many Pagan traditions mark Imbolc as a celebration of the Celtic goddess Brighid. This guardian of hearth and home is celebrated in her aspect as a fire goddess, so why not put together some craft projects to honor her? Try making a Brighid’s Cross to hang on your door or wall, a Brighid Doll to sit in your kitchen, or even a Brighid’s Floral Crown as an altar centerpiece.

How To Make a Brighid’s Crown
Brighid is the goddess who reminds us that spring is around the corner. She watches over hearth and home, and this craft project combines her position as firekeeper with that of fertility goddess. Make this crown as an altar decoration, or leave off the candles and hang it on your door for Imbolc.

You’ll need the following supplies:

  • A circular wreath frame, either of straw or grapevine
  • Winter evergreens, such as pine, fir or holly
  • Spring flowers, such as forsythia, dandelions, crocus, snowbulbs
  • Red, silver and white ribbons
  • Candles at least 4″ long — tapers are perfect for this
  • A hot glue gun

Place the wreath form on a flat surface. Using the hot glue gun, attach the candles around the circle. Next, attach a mixture of winter greenery and spring flowers to the wreath. Blend them together to represent the transition between winter and spring. Make it as thick and lush as you can, weaving in and around the candles. Wrap the ribbons around the wreath, weaving between the candles. Leave some excess ribbons hanging off, if you plan to hang this on your door or a wall, and then braid it or tie in a bow. If you’re using it on an altar, light the candles during rituals to honor Brighid.

What You Need

  • A wreath form
  • Winter greenery and spring flowers
  • Candles
  • Ribbons

IMBOLC FEASTING AND FOOD
Imbolc is a great time of fire and feasting. Since Imbolc celebrates the season of “ewe’s milk,” feel free to focus on recipes and treats that utilize dairy products. Whip up some kitchen magic for your Sabbat meal with these tasty recipes of the season! Try out a batch of Baked Custard.  

The word “Imbolc” comes in part from the phrase “ewe’s milk,” so dair070829_colour_custard-742173y products become a big part of February celebrations. For our ancestors, this time of year was hard – the winter stores were running low and there were no fresh crops. The livestock was typically preparing for birth, and the lambing season would begin soon. At that time, the ewes came into milk, and once milk arrived, you knew your family would have a source of food again. Sheep’s milk is highly nutritious, and sheep were considered a dairy animal long before cattle. If you have eggs, then you’ve got the makings of custard, a perfect dairy dessert.

Total Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 4 eggs
  • 3 C. milk
  • 1/2 C. sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • A pinch of salt

Preparation:
Preheat your oven to 350. Combine all the ingredients into the bowl of a food processor, and blend for about 15 seconds, or until well mixed. Pour custard mix into ramekins or custard cups. Place the ramekins into a baking dish, and fill the dish with hot water up to a depth of about ¾”. Bake the custards for one hour.

Excerpts from Patti Wigington on about.com

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